All Tombs

Showing Tombs 1-14 of 15
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    Allama Iqbal Mausoleum

    Allama Iqbal tomb is the most simple and impressive structure situated in Lahore, Pakistan, between Lahore Fort and Badshahi Masjid. The structure of Allama Iqbal tomb is a reflection of a combination of Moorish and Afghan Architecture. Red sandstones were used to manufacture the tomb of Allama Iqbal. Thousands of people come to visit the mausoleum per day to pay their due respect to Poet Allama Iqbal.Allama Iqbal was considered as one of the most inspiring characters behind the movement of Pakistan. Allama Iqbal was given a name of Mukaffir-e-Pakistan which means the Thinker of Pakistan and Shair-e-Mashriq meaning the Poet of the East. Allama Iqbal died in 1938, 21 of April in Lahore at the age of 60.As a tribute to Allama Iqbal the name of the Lahore Airport was named Allama Iqbal International Airport.After the death of Allama Iqbal a committee was formed presided by Muhammad Hussain, the initial designs submitted by different architects were not satisfactory. The committee decided to design a new combination rather than following specific school of arthitect.The final mode was designed from Mughal tradition and was a mixture of Moorish and Afghanistan architecture. The Tomb has two gates located at the eastern and southern sides, tiled with marble. White marbles were used to build the grave.There are Quranic verses inscribed in calligraphy on tombstone. People of Afghanistan gifted the tombstone. Ghazals are carved from the book name Zabur-e-Ajam written by Allama Iqbal inside walls. There is a small garden outside divided into small plots. Tomb was architect by Nawab Zain Yar Jang Bahadur which took 13 years to build this tomb, the major reason of delay was the shortage of red stone from Jaipur .The tomb was built at a cost of one hundred thousand rupees.

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    Anarkali Tomb

    Anarkali Tomb is one of the famous Tombs and Historical  In Pakistan. It Is Located In Lahore, Punjab Pakistan. It is now believed that Nadira Begum (named "Anarkali" due to her red like complexion like a “pomegranate” in full bloom)  died in mysterious circumstances when Akbar was away in Deccan.There are different versions exist on her death. In which one account is her natural death when Emperor Akbar was visiting Deccan and he ordered to build a tomb.In other accounts, which are not verily proved by historian is being poisoned by other courtiers after receiving orders from Prince Salem (Jehangir) when she was concubine of Akbar too and the mother of Danial (Jehangir's brother). And the most popular version is of this s that when emperor was in Deccan, Prince Salim made advances on the beautiful woman, and on learning of this the emperor ordered that she be buried alive so that any misunderstanding between the emperor and the prince be removed. Here, we cannot ignore the fact that court historian had also recorded the natural death of "Danial"s mother.A note from a British traveller William Finch, who visited Lahore in 1608, three years after Prince Salim ascended the throne as Emperor Jahangir. “The King (Jahangir), in token of his love, commands a sumptuous tomb to be built of stone in the midst of a four-square garden richly walled, with a gate and diverse rooms over it,” wrote William Finch. But he failed to provide any other detail and this can be in result of his imagination. The tomb of Anarkali is one of the most significant buildings of the Mughal period.It is an ingeniously planned octagonal building. Circular in shape and roofed by a lofty dome, the tomb once surrounded a garden, called Anarkali Garden, but during the last couple of hundred years it has been put to several uses. Under the Sikhs, the mausoleum was occupied by kharak Singh. Later it served as the residence of General Ventura, the Italian General of Ranjit Singh’s army. Under the British, The tomb was converted into Church (a protestant Church) in 1851 right after 2 years of British Control on Lahore. Few years later, it was converted to St. James' Church in 1857 till 1891. Since then, it has been used as Punjab Archives Museum with an amazing treasure for those interested in the history of British Punjab.

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    Asakusa-jinja

    Asakusa Shrine is a Shinto shrine located in the Asakusa district of Tokyo, Japan. Also known as Sanja-sama (Shrine of the Three gods), it is one of the most famous Shinto shrines in the city. The shrine honors the three men who founded the Sensō-ji. Asakusa Shrine is part of a larger grouping of sacred buildings in the area. It can be found on the east side of the Sensō-ji down a street marked by a large stone torii. One of the only two buildings in the area to survive World War II, it is designated an Important Cultural Property due to its long history.

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    Chaukhandi Tombs

    The Chaukhandi Tombs near Karachi, Pakistan are a unique example of such burials. Buried south to north – unusual for the area and time period – these tombs are constructed out of huge sandstone slabs, which are delicately stacked into a finessed pyramid shape. The slabs were then clearly painstakingly carved with intricate patterns, drawings, and relatable scenes. Built between the 15th and 18th centuries, the Chaukhandi Tombs now form a remarkably well-preserved necropolis that often attracts curious visitors and archeologists alike, but the area is not without foreboding legends.Beyond the elaborate decoration of the tombs, another feature the tombs seem to share with similar necropolis around the world is the conviction locals tend to have that the area is haunted. The tombs at Chaukhandi are renowned for being one of the most haunted sites in the region, and visitors are particularly warned against entering the graveyard at night.Avoiding the tombs at night isn’t bad advice, haunting or otherwise, because the details and drawings on these fascinating artifices are clearly best experienced in the broad light of day. A fact for which many visitors are likely very thankful.

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    Fushimi Inari Taisha

    Fushimi Inari Taisha is the head shrine of the god Inari, located in Fushimi Ward in Kyoto, Japan. The shrine sits at the base of a mountain also named Inari which is 233 metres (764 ft) above sea level, and includes trails up the mountain to many smaller shrines which span 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) and take approximately 2 hours to walk up. First and foremost, Inari is the god of rice, but merchants and manufacturers have traditionally worshiped Inari as the patron of business. Each of the torii at Fushimi Inari Taisha has been donated by a Japanese business.This popular shrine is said to have as many as 32,000 sub-shrines throughout Japan

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    Jahangir's Tomb

    Jahangir's Tomb is a Historical Tomb and tourist attraction Located in Shahdara, Punjab Pakistan. The emperor Jahangir died in camp on a return journey from Kashmir in 1627, and was buried at Shahdara, 3 miles north-West of Lahore at that time. The tomb of Jahangir stands beside a former bank of the Ravi in the midst of a large garden 1,500 feet square, enclosed by a brick wall with a monumental gateway in the middle of the Westside. Brick-paved causeways divide the garden into 16 square flower-beds, with an ornamental tank and fountain at each intersection; and in its prime the “paradise” must have provided a beautiful and fragrant resting-place. It is recorded to have been originally the garden of Jahangir’s celebrated queen, Nur Jahan, and the emperor was buried there at his own request.The tomb of Jahangir itself is also square, with sides of 325 feet, and consists of an arcaded platform with tall octagonal corner-towers and a projecting entrance-bay in the midst of each side. The external walls, including the lowest stage of the towers, are faced with Mathura sandstone, the red colour of which is dominated by a rich panel-decoration inlaid in white and black marble. The panels are partly geometrical and partly of the Persian “niche” design, with representations of vases in some of the niches. The corner-towers are of five stages of which the three intermediate stages are decorated with horizontal zigzag inlay, alternately of white and yellow marble separated by black marble lines.The topmost stages are white marble “Hindu” pavilions. The stages are separated by bracketed balconies. The general design of these towers is graceful and effective. Their prototypes in the Indo-Pakistan sub-continent are best represented in Gujarat and the Deccan, where the culminating example is the famous Char Minar of Hyderabad (A.D. 1591). But there, as at Champanir and elsewhere, the pavilion of the distinctive “Hindu” type is lacking; and it is rather in the use of low octagonal corner-towers surmounted by “Hindu” pavilions at Akbar’s tomb near Agra (A.D. 1612-13) that the immediate forebear of the North Indian series is to be recognized. Octagonal corner-towers of tomb of Jahangir, relatively taller than those of Akbar’s tomb, were also attached to the charming little tomb of I‘timad-ud-Daula at Agra in 1628, contemporaneously with their still bolder inclusion in the design of Jahangir’s tomb.A few years later, in Wazir Khan’s mosque at Lahore (1634), similar towers or minarets stood detached and emphatic, and at the same time four isolated minarets were being incorporated in the design of the Taj Mahal. Later again, in 1673, four independent octagonal towers defined the courtyard of the great Badshahi mosque at Lahore. In all these, the crowning element is the Hindu pavilion, and the group may be regarded as essentially a part of the Mughal Indo-Iranian complex.On the roof of the main platform of Jahangir’s tomb is a central podium which probably, again on a general analogy with Akbar’s tomb, carried a marble pavilion. There is evidence of a former (marble) railing around the outer edge of the podium in the tomb of Jahangir, but the present marble flooring is a relatively modern patchwork which conceals the exact plan of the superstructure. Like so much else, the latter was doubtless removed by the Sikhs at the end of the eighteenth or beginning of the nineteenth century.

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    Kumanonachi Taisha Shrine

    Kuo Nachi Taishaman is a Shinto shrine and part of the UNESCO-designated World Heritage Sacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range of Japan. The Kumano Kodō route connects it to other sites under the same classification, which are primarily located in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan. The four sites on the route, classified as pilgrimage destinations and World Heritage Sites, are: 1) Nachi Taisha; 2) Hongū Taisha; 3) Hayatama Taisha; 4) Koya-san. Kumano Nachi Taisha is also one of the three sacred Kumano Sanzan shrines: Kumano Nachi Taisha Kumano Hongū Taisha Kumano Hayatama Taisha This classification is based mostly in Japanese history, as pilgrims would travel to all three sites to complete their pilgrimage. Kumano Nachi Taisha is an example of Buddhist and Shinto syncretism (Shinbutsu shūgō) nestled in the Kii Mountains, near Kii Katsuura, Japan. Cedar forests surround the site. The Nachi Waterfall, worshiped at Hiryū Shrine near Kumano Nachi Taisha is believed to be inhabited by a kami called Hiryū Gongen. Also, there is a sacred tree at this site, Sacred Camphor Tree, which located between the Nachi Shrine (heiden) and Seigantoji Temple. It is 850 years old and is said to have been planted by Taira-no-Shigemori(1138-1179). The straw rope (shimenawa) and paper flags show that this tree has been sanctified as a kami. The tree is alive with moss and ferns and other small plants growing on its ancient limbs. It is possible to enter the tree where there is a small altar for making offerings – inside the tree you feel as though you actually hear the beating of its 800-year-old heart! Nachi-no-Hi Matsuri Fire Festival, performed on July 14 is the major festival of Kumano Nachi Taisha. It is a fire festival in which 6 meters high portable shrines symbolically representing that the waterfall are purified with the fires from oversized torches laboriously carried by men dressed in white.

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    Mazar-e-Quaid

    Mazar-e-Quaid, also known as the Jinnah Mausoleum or the National Mausoleum, is the final resting place of Quaid-e-Azam (Great Leader) Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, as well as his sister, Māder-e Millat (Mother of the Nation) Fatima Jinnah, and Liaquat Ali Khan, the first Prime Minister of Pakistan. Located in the Jamshed Quarters neighborhood of Karachi. The mausoleum is completed in the 1960s, is an iconic symbol of Karachi throughout the world. It is one of the most popular tourist destinations among foreign visitors to Karachi. The location is usually calm and tranquil which is significant considering that it is in the heart of one of the largest global megalopolises. The glowing tomb can be seen for miles at night. Official and military ceremonies take place here on special occasions, such as on 23 March (Pakistan Day), 14 August (Independence Day), 11 September (the anniversary of Jinnah’s death) and 25 December (Jinnah’s birthday). Dignitaries and officials from foreign countries also visit the mausoleum during official tours.The Mausoleum building was designed by famous architect Yahya Merchant. It is made of white marble with curved Moorish arches and copper grills reset on an elevated 54-square-meter platform. The mausoleum is located in a 53-hectare park and the building has a footprint of 75 by 75 m (246 by 246 ft) with a height of 43 m (141 ft), built on a 4 m (13 ft) high platform. In each wall is placed an entrance. Fifteen successive fountains lead to the platform from one side and from all sides, terraced avenues lead to the gates. The cool inner sanctum reflects the green of a four-tiered crystal chandelier gifted by the People’s Republic of China. Around the mausoleum is a park fitted with strong beamed spot-lights which at night project light on the white mausoleum. In the interior of the grave complex, there are three graves in a row and one to the north. The northern one, which is decorated with a series of black floral design at the base, belongs to Miss Fatima Jinnah, Quaid-e-Azam’s sister. Out of the three graves, the northern one belongs to Liaquat Ali Khan, the first Prime Minister of Pakistan.The extreme southern grave belongs to Sardar Abdur Rab Nishtar. In the middle lies buried Nurul Amin, who rose to be the Vice-President of Pakistan. All these graves are made of Italian white marble, and they are of the box type, like the sarcophagus of Jinnah, placed on a triple base. But the sides of these graves are tapering inward while that of Jinnah are diverging outward. These are all plain graves, except that of Mohtarma Fatima Jinnah, which has a basal floral ornamentation.

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    Nizami Ganjavi Mausoleum

    The Nizami Mausoleum, built in honor of the 12th-century poet Nizami Ganjavi, stands just outside the city of Ganja, Azerbaijan. The mausoleum was originally built in 1947 in place of an old collapsed mausoleum, and rebuilt in its present form in 1991. The tomb of Nizami has been a place of devoted pilgrimage for many centuries. According to historian Vasily Bartold, the mausoleum was first mentioned in historical chronicles in 1606. The Safavid court chronicler Iskander Beg Munshi reported that toward the end of February 1606, Shah Abbas I reached Ganja and camped near the tomb of Sheikh Nizami, where on 24 March he celebrated the holiday of Novruz. During the Russo-Persian War in 1826 a decisive battle between Russian and Persian forces took place near the tomb of Nizami. The Russian forces under the command of General Ivan Paskevich defeated the Persian army and forced it to retreat. Russian envoy to Persia Aleksandr Griboyedov mentioned in his diary a conversation with writer and historian Abbasgulu Bakikhanov, a member of the Russian diplomatic mission at the time, in which the latter told him that Elisabethpol battle was near the Nizami tomb.

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    Okunoin

    Okunoin is the site of the mausoleum of Kobo Daishi (also known as Kukai), the founder of Shingon Buddhism and one of the most revered persons in the religious history of Japan. Instead of having died, Kobo Daishi is believed to rest in eternal meditation as he awaits Miroku Nyorai (Maihreya), the Buddha of the Future, and provides relief to those who ask for salvation in the meantime. Okunoin is one of the most sacred places in Japan and a popular pilgrimage spot. The Ichinohashi Bridge (first bridge) marks the traditional entrance to Okunoin, and visitors should bow to pay respect to Kobo Daishi before crossing it. Across the bridge starts Okunoin's cemetery, the largest in Japan, with over 200,000 tombstones lining the almost two kilometer long approach to Kobo Daishi's mausoleum. Wishing to be close to Kobo Daishi in death to receive salvation, many people, including prominent monks and feudal lords, have had their tombstones erected here over the centuries.

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    Qutb-ud-din Aibak's Tomb

    Many would have walked around the busy streets of Anarkali in Lahore buying or window shopping. But perhaps few would have known that in one of the streets of Anakarli Bazaar lies buried Emperor Qutb ud Din Aibak, considered to be the first Muslim ruler of South Asia and builder of the famous Qutab Minar in Delhi, which is considered as the tallest brick minaret in the world. Qutb-ud-din Aibak was born in Turk family of Central Asia. As a child he was captured sold as a slave, but was lucky to be purchased by one of the chieftains of Nishapur, who treated him like one of his own sons. Aibak received good education and was trained in the field of archery and horsemanship. However, upon death of chief Qazi, he was sold once again by the sons of the dead chief. As the luck would have had it, the famous Muhammad Ghauri bought him and became an instant favourite of his new master because of his exceptional character and qualities. Thereafter, Aibak steadily rose through the ranks and eventually became a General. Like Ghauri, Aibak performed his greatest deeds while still a subordinate. He was responsible for most of the conquests of Northern India and was appointed as Ghauri's Viceroy to Delhi. When Ghuri died in 1206, the Turkish Amirs and Generals elected Aibak as the new Sultan. It was he who shifted the capital first from Ghazni to Lahore, and then from Lahore to Delhi, and thus is considered as the first Muslim ruler of South Asia.

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    Royal Tomb of Khai Dinh King

    The Tomb of Khải Định (Vietnamese: Lăng Khải Định), officially Ứng Mausoleum (Ứng lăng), is located in Chau Chu mountain near Huế in Vietnam. It was built for Khải Định, the twelfth Emperor of the Nguyễn dynasty. It was built from 1920 to 1931 taking 11 years to complete. The tomb is a blend of Western and Eastern architecture. It is located on a steep hill outside of the capital city of Huế. In 1916, Khải Định became the Emperor of Vietnam. The Emperor worked closely with the government of France, and by the end of his reign he was considered to be nothing more than "a salaried employee of the French government."Due to this close collaboration, he was very unpopular amongst the people of Vietnam. Like a number of Vietnamese emperors, Khải Định desired the preparation of a tomb in anticipation of his death, but he was the last member of the Nguyễn Dynasty to make this decision. Construction began in 1920 and concluded in 1931, with the Emperor increasing tax by 30 percent to fund the lavish mausoleum. Before his 1925 death, the Emperor visited France where he was likely influenced by the architectural styles there, evidenced by the European influences in his Oriental mausoleum. The tomb was completed by Bảo Đại, Khải Định's successor, in 1931.

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    Sultanwas - Ghazi Khaney

    Tipu Sultan (ٹیپو سلطان) was the eldest son of Haider Ali (حیدرعلی) and his mother’s name was Fakhr-un-Nissa (فخرالنسا‏‏‎ء), born on 20th November 1750 A.D. at Devanahalli. Haider Ali (حیدرعلی) named his son after a great Sufi saint namely Tipu Mastan Aulia (ٹیپومستان اولیاء) Haider Ali gave good education to his son Tipu Sultan ۔(ٹیپو سلطان)Right from his early years he was trained in the art of warfare He received military education from Ghazi-Khan who was a great warrior and also a military officer in the army of Haider Ali and at the age of 15 he used to accompany his father Haider Ali, (the ruler of Mysore میسور), to different military campaigns, participating in the wars that were fought by his father. Tipu Sultan (ٹیپو سلطان) helped his father both in the First and the Second Mysore Wars. He was also a brave soldier and great general. In Addition, he also learnt different languages, He was well versed in Urdu (اردو) , Persian(فارسی), and Arabic (عربی)languages, mathematics and science. Tipu Sultan (ٹیپو سلطان) had a fascination for learning. His personal library consisted of more than 2,000 books in different languages. After the death of Haider Ali(حیدرعلی) , Tipu Sultan (ٹیپو سلطان)was enthroned as the ruler of Mysore (میسور) on 4th May 1783 A.D. in a simple ceremony at Bejnur (بجنور). He was an extremely active man and worked hard for the welfare of his subjects He continued the Second Mysore War (جنگ میسور – دوم) against the English. He defeated many English generals like Brithwhite & Col. Bailey in 1783. Tipu Sultan (ٹیپو سلطان) attacked the Raja of Travancore (راجاتراوانکور) . In the first stage of the war (Third Mysore War جنگ میسور – سوم: 1790-92 A.D.) General Medows and General Kolly planned the course of action. Medows tried to reach Mysore through Coimbatore. Kolly was supposed to reach Bangalore through Baramahal District. But he died without achieving anything. Medows efforts were checked by Tipu Sultan (ٹیپو سلطان) at Sathyamangalam and then he recaptured the places which were occupied by Medows. In the initial stages, Tipu Sultan (ٹیپو سلطان) gained upper hand over the English. As long as the British fought alone, Tipu Sultan (ٹیپو سلطان) always defeated them. But he could not come over their diplomacy, conspiracy and intrigue. Thus he was defeated in the Second half in his capital, Seringapatam, and was forced to sign a humiliating treaty on March 22, 1792. As a result he had to concede half of his kingdom and pay an indemnity of 33 million rupees to the British and their allies. Since he could not pay war indemnity in full, he accepted to send his second and third sons namely Abdul Khaliq and Maiz-Uddin aged 10 and 8 respectively as hostages till he would pay the war indemnity. He paid the balance amount after two years and received his sons in 1794 A.D. at Devanahalli.

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    Tomb of Noor Jahan

    The Tomb of Nur Jahan is a red sandstone mausoleum located in Shahdara Bagh in Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan. It was constructed for the Mughal Empress Nur Jahan as her final resting place. Nur Jahan (alternative spelling Noor Jahan, Nur Jehan, etc.) (31 May 1577 – 17 December 1645) born as Mehr-un-Nissa, was Empress of the Mughal Empire as the chief consort of Emperor Jahangir. A strong, charismatic and well-educated woman, she is considered to be one of the most powerful and influential women of the 17th century Mughal Empire. She was the twentieth and favorite wife of the Emperor Jahangir who ruled the Mughal Empire at the peak of its power and supremacy. The story of the couple’s infatuation for each other and the relationship that developed between them has been an inspiration to many (often apocryphal) legends.The whole mausoleum is surrounded by Mughal gardens. Unlike her father's tomb (tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah), which was constructed in white marble, Nur Jahan's mausoleum is primarily clad in red sandstone.Standing on a platform of 158 square feet the tomb measures 124 square feet and 19.6 feet high. The vaulted ceilings were covered with marble and wrought with flower mosaics in semi-precious stones. Minute paneling was executed in intricate patterns and cornices are honeycomb shaped in several rooms. The inner floor is covered with marble and the outer platform with sandstone.The exterior, encased in red sandstone, was inlaid with floral motifs in addition to white, black and yellow marble. Turtle The central vaulted chamber of the tomb contains a marble platform with two cenotaphs, one that commemorates Nur Jahan and the other to commemorate her daughter, Ladli Begum. Built by Hakim Ajmal, Khan of Delhi in 1912, the original marble sarcophagus bears ornate workmanship and the name of Allah, in the same style and size as seen in the tombs of Jahangir and Asif Khan.

Showing Tombs 1-14 of 15